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Full text of "Residency Training Programs In The United States Navy"



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RESIDENCY TRAININl 

in the United States Navy 



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FOREWORD 



The high standards of medical practice in the 
Navy attest to the caliber of its Medical Corps • 
Naval Medical officers seeking professional 
advancement find ample opportunities available 
to tliem throughout tfieir entire naval service. 
The Navy encourages its medical officers to 
participate to the limit of their capabilities and 
offers every possible assistcaice in furthering 
their medical careers. 

To maintain these standards requires continuing 
augmentation by physicians of equal professional 
stature. To such men and women the Navy 
offers residencies which compare favorcfcly with 
any available in civilian hospitals* In addition, 
an outstanding postgraduate Medical Training 
Program provides opportunities for continuing 
professional advcaicement. 



i 



This brochure has been prepared to acquaint you 
with the Navy's Residency Training Program and 
to assist you in evaluating. Navy medicine. It 
is our conviction that you will find the Medical 
Corps of tfie United States Navy a stimulating, 
challenging, and rewarding career. 




O/VT 



Rear Admiral, MC, USN 
Surgeon General, U. S. Navy 



l^<^- 

,-^-"**1 



in tlie XJnited Sta>tes Na-vy 



Approved framing in every major specialty and subspecialty of medicine and 
surgery is available fo physicians through the Navy Residency Training Program. 
Residency training is sponsored by the Navy In selected U.S. Naval Hospitals, 
and, depending upon the needs of the service, in a number of civilian medical 
schools and medical centers throughout the United States. The caliber of residency 
training in the Navy is maintained at a high level, and all residencies are 
approved by the various specialty boards and by the Council on Medical Education 
and Hospitals of the American Medical Association. 

The services of eminently qualified civilian lecturers from the leading civilian 
medical institutions of the United States are utilized actively to assist in conduct- 
ing and maintaining these training programs rn accordance with the highest 
traditions of American medicine. For the current fiscal year there are 500 such 
lecturers, each selected for his proven capabilities in teaching as well as for his 
contributions to medical science. The civilian lecturer staff at each of the teach- 
ing hospitals throughout the Navy covers all the specialties in which residency 
training is offered. Contributions by civilian lecturers are of extreme importance 
in maintaining a teaching atmosphere in our training hospitals and in improving 
the high standards of patient care. 

The chiefs of the professional services in the Navy's teaching hospitals are chosen 
from among carefully selected naval medical officers, and qlmost without exception 
are diplomates of the specialty board concerned. Under any circumstances, 
residency training in the Navy is supervised by a diplomote of the respective 
specialty board. 

All residency training programs in the Navy are carefully integrated to assure that 
no vital area of training is omitted or covered superficially, whether such training 
is received in naval facilities or jointly in naval and civilian institutions. Also, 
the training program is well-bolanced to furnish the required numbers of qualified 
and trained physicians in specialties. The Navy attempts to keep abreast of, and 
to make contributions to, advancements in medical science in all of its specialties 
and subspecialties and expands, modifies, and improves Its residency training 
program accordingly. 



In many instances selected naval medical officers are ordered to various civilian 
medical centers so thaf they may work with the pioneers and authorities in the 
newer methods and techniques. For example, some of the Navy's cardiovascular 
surgeons have been working witfi civilian experts in the field of open heart surgery, 
the pump oxygenator, and other equipment vital to such surgery, A program has 
been instituted by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery to train special teams, 
consisting of cardiac surgeons, cardiac physiologists, electronics physicists, 
anesthesiologists, nurses, and hospital corpsmen for this program. 

The problems created by supersonic speeds and great altitudes attained by jet 
aircraft, and by other recent advances in the field of aviation, have promoted a 
vigorous program in aviation medical research on a broadening front to keep pace 
with the problems. Aviation Medicine is now recognized as a distinct branch of 
medical science and tfie Navy has an approved residency program In this specialty 
at the U.S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine, a component of the U. S. Naval 
Aviation Medical Center, Pensacola, Florida. Specialists who meet the require- 
ments of tfre specialty board are now being certified by the American Board of 
Preventive Medicine in Aviation Medicine. 

Postgraduate training In public health is offered in civilian institutions. This 
instruction period, if It is followed by the prescribed field experience and practice 
will fulfill the requirements for examination in Public Health by tfie American 
Board of Preventive Medicine, The practice of public health assures healthful 
environments for the Navy's fighting forces in ships, barracks and messes, and 
prevents or minimizes the effects of epidemics on all Navy and Marine Corps 
personnel . 

Navy teaching hospitals provide clinical experience with patients of all age groups 
and both sexes. 

Naval officers are currently undergoing residency training or formal courses in 38 
specialties and subspecialties of medicine and surgery. 

Requests for residency training are acted upon by the Advisory Board on Professional 
Matters of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, This board makes recommendations 
based upon the merits of each case, taking into consideration the professional 
experience, background, and aptitude of the candidate and the needs of the 
service in the particular specialty In which training is requested. 



( 



2 



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I 



Applicants for the Residency Training Program specify in their written requests 
that they agree to serve for periods of active duty in accordance with the follow- 
ing: 



Residency in a 
Military Hospital 




Obligated Service 
Following Residency 


Total 


1 year 

2 years 

3 " 

4 " 






1 year 

2 years 

3 " 

4 " 


2 years 
4 " 
6 " 
8 " 


Courses or Residency in a 
Civilian School or Hospital 
Under Navy Sponsorship 


Obligated Service 
Following Course 
or Residency 


Tota 



6 months to 1 year 

2 years 

3 " 

4 " 



Two months for 
each month of 
formal training 




2 years 

3 " 

4 " 

5 " 


3 years 
5 " 
7 " 
9 " 



The U, S, Naval Hospitals listed below are approved for residency training. 







No. Patients 


Autopsy 


Hospital 


Total Beds 


Admitted 


Percent 


Oakland^ Calif. 


1,325 


14,387 


87 


San Diego, Calif. 


2,125 


26,399 


86 


Great Lakes, III. 


850 


10,796 


86 


Bethesda, Md. 


1,041 


12,551 


90 


Chelsea, Mass. 


625 


3,170 


78 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


1,325 


10,326 


73 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1,030 


11,498 


69 


Portsmouth, Va. 


1,600 


21,566 


80 



3 



The following tables show some of the professional specialties included in the 
Navy Residency Training Program in U. S. Naval Hospitols, and some of the 
relevant data concerning the hospitals and services involved, for a typical year: 



f 



ANESTHSSIOI.OG'S' 









Program 


Hospital 


Anesthetics 


Inhalation 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif. 


9,996 


1,153 


2 years 


San Diego, Calif. 


13,737 


2,366 


2 " 


Bettiesda, Md. 


8,882 


2,458 


2 " 


Chelsea, Moss. 


5,644 


1,215 


2 " 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


6,516 


564 


2 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


6,508 


1,354 


2 " 



Ci^BDIOVASCXTLiVR DISEASES 



Hospital 



Inpatients Autopsy Program 

Treated Percent Approved for 



Bethesda, Md. 
San Diego, Call f • 



606 
914 



90 

87 



1 year 
1 " 



DERACATOLOCS^Y a^nd SYPHILOLOaY 



Hospital 



Inpatients Outpatients Program 

Treated Treated Approved for 



* 



San Diego, Calif, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



247 
211 



13,989 
10,972 



3 years* 
3 years** 



One of the 3 years at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. 
One of the 3 years at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 



6ENERA.X. PRACTICE 



Hospital 



Admissions 



Autopsy Program 
Beds Percent Approved for 



San Diego, Calif. 
Oakland, Calif. 



26,339 
14,387 



2,125 
1,325 



86 
87 



2 years 
2 " 



INTERN^A.!. MEHICINE 





Inpatients 


Program 


Hospital 


Treated 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif. 


3,256 


3 years 


San Diego, Calif. 


4,690 


3 " 


Great Lakes, III. 


3,573 


2 " 


Bethesda, Md. 


773 


3 " 


Chelsea, Mass, 


2,258 


3 " 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


1,598 


3 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


2,658 


3 " 


Portsmouth, Va. 


4,546 


3 " 



Hospital 

Bethesda, Md» 
Philadelphia, Pa, 



NEXJROI-OGY 

Inpatients 
Treated 

302 
131 



Program 
Approved for 

2 years* 
1 year** 



* Third year training in Neurology is given in a civilian hospital under 

naval sponsorship. 
** Second and third years are given in a civilian hospital under naval 

sponsorship, 

OSSTETRICS axid GYNECOLOGY 





Inpatients 




Progi 


•am 


Hospital 


Treated 


Births 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif. 


3,923 


2,111 


3> 


'ears 


San Diego, Calif. 


7,431 


4,753 


3 




Great Lakes, III. 


3,455 


1,985 


3 




Bethesda, Md. 


3,445 


2,123 


3 




Chelsea, Mass. 


1,505 


1,320 


3 




St. Albans, N. Y. 


2,529 


1,689 


3 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


2,746 


1,835 


3 




Portsmouth, Va. 


6,563 


4,884 


3 





5 



OPIITXIA.I.iaOLOGV 





Inpatients 


Outpatients 


Program 


Hospital 


Treated 


Treated 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif. 


366 


7,286 


3 years 


Son Diego, Calif. 


408 


17,923 


3 " 


Bethesda, Md. 


1,055 


6,197 


3 " 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


173 


5,278 


3 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


310 


7,490 


3 " 



ORTKOPEDIC SURGERY 





Inpatients 


Program 


Hospital 


Treated 


Approved for 


Chelsea, Mass.* 


903 


3 years 


Oakland, Calif.* 


1,615 


3 " 


Portsmouth, Va.* 


2,335 


3 " 


Bethesda, Md.** 


978 


4 " 


Philadelphia, Pa.** 


916 


4 " 



One year children's orthopedics given at civilian hospital under Navy 

sponsorship. 

One year children's orthopedics given at Alfred I. DuPont Institute 

of the Nemours Foundation, Wilmington, Delaware 



I 

4 



OTOLARYNGOLOGY 





Inpatients 


Outpatients. 


Program 


Hospital 


Treated 


Treated 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif, 


935 


7,629 


3 years 


San Diego, Calif. 


1,461 


14,025 


3 " 


Bethesda, Md. 


1,284 


7,763 


3 " 


Philadelphia, Pa, 


645 


5,712 


3 ". 



6 



PA.TIIOLOGV 









Specimens 










Examined 


Program 




Laboratory 


Surgical 


Microscop- 


Approved 


Hospital Autopsies 


Examinations 


Specimens 


ically 


for 


Oakland, Calif. 193 


198,919 


8,394 


8,394 


4 years 


Son Diego, Calif. 401 


672,796 


7,382 


7,382 


4 " 


Bethesdo, Md. 206 


408,208 


13,467 


13,467 


4 " 


St. Albans, N. Y. 100 


358,152 


8,098 


8,048 


4 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 189 


264,475 


3,503 


3,503 


4 " 



PEDIA-TItlCS 





Inpatients 


Program 


Hospital 


Treated 


Approved for 


Oakland, Calif. 


1,662 


2 years 


San Diego, Calif. 


1,337 


2 " 


Bethesda, Md. 


1,143 


2 " 


Chelsea, Mass. 


802 


2 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


402 


2 " 


Portsmouth, Va. 


1,341 


2 " 



PREVENTIVE BCEDICINE Ci^VIi^TION ACEDICINE) 



School 



Program Approved for 



Naval School of Aviation Medicine, 
U.S. Naval Aviation Medical Center, 
Pensacola, Florida 



2 years 



PSYCIIIi\.TRY 



Hospital 



Inpatients 
Treated 



Program 
Approved for 



Oakland, Calif. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



1,220 

651 

1,480 



3 years 
3 " 
2 " 



7 



Ri^DIOLOGV 



Superficial Program 





X-Ray 


Deep X-Ray 


X-Ray 


Approved 


Hospital 


Examinations 


Treatments 


Treatments 


for 


Oakland, Calif.* 


34,452 


1,878 


209 


3 years 


San Diego, Calif. 


84,023 


6,450 


105 


3 " 


Bethesda, Md.* 


40,564 


3,042 


203 


3-1/2 years 


Chelsea, Mass.* 


20,232 


750 


268 


3 years 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


57,662 


3,526 


42 


3 " 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


49,962 


1,827 


70 


3 " 



One year in radiation therapy at a civilian institution. 



Hospital 



SURGERY 

Inpatients 
Treated Program Approved for 



Oakland, Calif. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Great Lakes, III. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Chelsea, Mass, 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Portsmouth, Va, 


1,701 
2,846 
1,811 
1,646 
2,628 
1,596 
2,477 
3,719 




4 years 
4 " 
4 " 

4 " 
4 " 
4 " 
4 " 
4 " 


XIXOIIA.CZC 


SXTRGEEIY 


Hospital 


Inpatients 
Treated 


Program Apprc 


San Diego, Calif. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 


229 
230 




2 years 
2 " 




XTROLOO'S' 




Hospital 


Inpatients 

Treated 


Program Appr 


Oakland, Calif. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Bethesda, Md. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


745 
1,205 
643 
496 
492 




3 years 
3 " 
3 " 
3 " 
3 " 



8 



Besideztcies in Na^va.! Activities 

a.zid 
Oblig^aited Service Beciuirezitezits 



Re si don cy 
Ht Re fen te Lomond 


NAVAL HOSPITALS | 


BETHESDA 
MD. 


CHELSEA 
MASS. 


G" LAKES 
ILL. 


OAKLAND 
CALIF. 


PHIL A. 
PA. 


PTSMTH 
VA. 


SAN DIEGO 
CALIF. 


ST . ALBANS 1 
N.Y. 1 


1 


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1 

1 

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8 
1 

E. 

6 


1 


01 

1 

1 


■s 
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1 

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£ 

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1, 


o 

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1 


8 
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1 


1 


8 

1 
1 

6 


1 

! 


8 
'E 
J! 

1 


ANESTHESICHOGY 


2 


2 


2 


2 






2 


2 


2 


1« 






2 


2 


2 


2 


AVIATION MEDICINEt 


































CARDIOVASCaAR DIS* 


1 


1 
























1 






DERM4 SYPHILOLOGY 


















3 


2« 








2* 






GENERAL PRACTICE 
















2 












2 






INTERNAL MEDICINE 




3 


3 


3 


2 


3* 




4« 


3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


NEUROLOGY 




5* 














1 


6« 














08 & GYN 






3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


OPHTHALMOLOGY 
















3 


3 


3 








3 


3 


3 


ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 




7» 


3 


I* 








B« 


3 


7# 


3 


1* 










OTOLARYNGOL OGY++ 
















4 


4 


4 








4 






PATHOLOGY 
















4 


4 


4 








4 


4 


4 


PEDIATRICS 






2 


2 








2 


2 


2 


2 


2 




2 






PLASTIC SURGERY 




9» 


























1 


9« 


PSYCHIATRY 
















3 


2 


to« 














RADIOLOGY 


• 1 


11« 


3 


12* 








13* 


3 


3 








14* 


3 


15« 


SURGERY 






4 


4 


4 


4 




4 


4 


4 


4 


4 




4 


4 


4 


THORACIC SURGERY 




























2 


2 


2 


UROLOGY 


3 


tt« 










3 


16* 


3 


16* 








16« 


3 


16# 



(PLEASE NOTE: Foohnotes and Legend appear on following pages.) 



9 



(Footnotes to Table on preceding page,) 



+ The U. S. Naval School of Aviatfort Medicine, U. S. Naval Air Station, 
Pensacola, Florida, and the Aviation Medicine Acceleration Laboratory, 
Johnsville, Pennsylvania, are approved for 2 years of residency training in 
Aviation Medicine. This includes the in-service portion of the complete 
program. Two years of obligated service required. One year of training in 
Preventive Medicine rn an approved civilian university may be taken prior 
to, or after the in-service assignment. For this year, 2 years of obligated 
service are required. Total obligated service for the entire program will 
be 4 years, 

+t The training program in otolaryngology for residents entering training after 
1 July 1960 will include 1 year in an approved residency in general 
surgery, in addition to the presently required 3 years in otolaryngology « 
Total obligated service for the entire program will be 4 years. 



♦ LEGEND 



1 Optional 3 year program with 1 year assignment to the University 
Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, If 
this program is selected, total obligated service would be 4 years, 

2 * Philadelphia: 1 year at the Lhiversity of Pennsylvania, 

San Diego: 1 year at the Uhiversity of Southern California at Los 
Angeles, Obligated service, 4 years. 

3 Great Lakes pending approval for 3 full years of training. Obligated 
service 3 years when approval granted, 

4 May include 1 year in Clinical Investigation at the Clinical Investigation 
Center, Oakland, California. No additional obligated service required. 

5 Third year of training is given in a civilian institution under Bureau 
sponsorship. Obligated service, 4 years, 

6 Second year received at Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, Legend 5 
above applies to the third year. Obligated service, 4 years. 

7 Affiliated with the Alfred I. Dupont Institute of the Nemours Foundation, 
Wilmington, Delaware, for the 4th year of training in Children's Orthopedics. 
Obligated service, 5 years, 

8 The fourth year to be taken in a civilian institution in Children's 
Orthopedics, under sponsorship of the Bureau. The institution may be 
selected by the candidate subject to approval by the Bureau. Obligated 
service, 5 years. 

10 



9* Pending approval for a 1-year program to be followed by 1 year in a 
civilian institution. Obligated service, 3 years. This does not include the 
General Surgery residency training required as a prerequisite to Plastic Surgery, 

10 The third year will be given at a naval hospital or in a civilian institution 
under Bureau sponsorship. Obligated service, 3 or 4 years depending on 
selection for the final year. 

1 1 Includes 1 year o\ the University of Chicago, 4 months in Radioactive 
Isotopes and 2 months at Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington 25, 
D, C. Total obligated service, 4-1/2 years, 

12 Includes 1 year at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, as an 
affiliated program. Obligated service, 4 years. 

13 Includes 1 year at the Los Angeles Tumor Institute, Los Angeles, 
California. Obligated service, 4 years. 

14 May include (optional) 1 year at the University of California at Los 
Angeles, Medical School, Los Angeles, California. If this program is 
selected, obligated service, 4 years. 

# 

15 Includes the 4 months' course in Radioactive Isotopes at Naval Hospital, 

Bethesda. Obligated service, 3 years. 

16 Programs provide for the firsfyear in General Surgery or Internal 
Medicine for a full 4-year program. Obligated service, 4 years. 



In order to provide maximum opportunities for training and to supplement 
or complement naval hospital programs, assignment of participants may be made to 
a medical school or civilian hospital for a part of their residency training. At the 
present time, dual training is being provided in the following specialties: 
anesthesiology, cancer surgery, dermatology and syphilology, hematology, 
internal medicine, neurology, neuropsychiatry, nuclear medicine, obstetrics and 
gynecology, occupational medicine, ophthalmology, pediatrics, psychoanalysis 
training, the clinical use of radioactive isotopes, radiobiology, radiology, 
surgery, thoracic surgery and urology. 

In the few specialties in which the Navy does not have formal board approved 
programs, in naval hospitals, residency training for medical officers is sponsored 
by the Navy in leading civilian medical institutions. Examples include: allergy, 
plastic surgery, neurosurgery, preventive medicine, children's orthopedic surgery 
and astronautical medicine. 



11 



the BiCilitairsr BCedicail Specialities 



Aviation Medicine 

The School of Aviation Medicine at Pensacola, Florida, offers a course In aviation 
medicine. This course is six months in length and includes training at the Flight 
and Ground School. Three classes convene each year. Upon completion of a 
course of Instruction, the graduates are designated *' Naval Flight Surgeons", and 
are assigned to a two-year period of operational duty. 

In addition, the School of Aviation Medicine is approved for residency training in 
aviation medicine. This residency training may be requested after completion of 
the two-year operational duty assignment. It consists of one year of public health 
at a civilian institution and two years of residency training in aviation medicine 
at the school in Pensacola, or any of the approved aviation research laboratories. 
Following completion of such training, flight surgeons are considered eligible, 
after an additional two years operational tour of duty, to apply for examination 
for board certification in aviation medicine. 

Also, several large naval laboratories provide opportunities for research related to 
aviation medicine. These laboratories are located at Johnsville, Pennsylvania; 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the School of Aviation Medicine, Pensacola, 
Florida, and the Naval Medical Research Institute, National Naval Medical 
Center, Bethesda, Maryland, 

Submarine Medicine 



This military medical specialty supports all phases of underwater operations in the 
Navy. Training in this specialty is particularly valuable to those having an 
interest In occupational medicine, public health, radiobiology or research. The 
basic six months'* course of training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory 
work, and cruises in submorines, rescue vessels, and tenders. 

Upon completion of the first four months, two alternatives are available to the 
student. He may elect to take a course in either radiobiology or underwater 
physiology during the last eight weeks. 

Although the major part of the submarine course is given at the Submarine School 
and Medical Research Laboratory at the Submarine Base, New London, Connecti- 
cut, the course in radiobiology is given at the Nuclear Power Division of the 
Submarine School. The essentials of nuclear physics, nuclear engineering, health 
physics, and the biological effects of radiation are taught. Medical officers who 
complete this course will be assigned to duty with the nuclear power submarine 
program , 



12 



The course in underwater physiology is taughf at the U. S. Naval Deep Sea Diving 
School, Naval Weapons Plant, Washington, D, C. Here the student learns about 
the physiological problems involved in diving and underwater swimming. He learns 
about diving bv completing deep sea diving exercises. The course also covers the 
recognition ana treatment of pathological conditions resulting from exposure to 
high atmospheric pressures. Those completing this course will be assigned duties 
witfi conventional submarine squadrons or operational units employing divers and 
underwater swimmers. 

Upon completion of a tour of duty witfi an operational unit the medical officer may 
apply for postgraduate training. He may prepare for certification in occupational 
medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine by attending one of the 
public health schools and by subsequent field duty ashore and afloat. He may 
prepare himself for a career In research by a postgraduate year at the University of 
Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Clinical medical specialty training In all fields 
is available; having served with an operational unit adds weight to one's applica- 
tion. 

Research Program 

The Navy is vitally concerned with research and provides a wide variety of 
opportunities for medical officers interested in this field. Research is being con- 
ducted now In aviation medicine, submarine medicine, clinical specialties, 
amphibious and field medicine, tropical and exotic diseases, and the medical 
aspects of nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare defense. These research 
facilities are provided In 15 In-service laboratories, strategically located 
throughout the world. 

Amphibious and Marine Corps Field Medicine 

Recognized as an imporfant military operational medical specialty, this training 
is conducted at Camp Lejeune, N. C, and Camp Pendleton, Calif. This 
specialty offers valuable training In the methods of sorting, managing, and 
evacuating mass casualties. 

In addition, training is offered in the development of field medical equipment, 
field sanitation methodology and practices, medical logistic support, and patient 
care under combat conditions. 

Nuclear Medicine 

Graduate courses In nuclear medicine are conducted at several naval hospitals in 
affiliation with civilian Institutions. Additional graduate courses In radloblology 
are sponsored at Reed College, Portland, Oregon, and the University of Rochester, 
Rochester, New York, to train personnel In the fields of nuclear propulsion, 
radiological safety, and special weapons effects. 

Formal courses are conducted in the clinical use of radioisotopes at the U.S. 
Naval Medical School, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. This 
course is approved by the Atomic Energy Commission. It Is designed to fulfill 
the needs of residents who desire certification by the American Board of Radiology, 
as well as residents in other specialties who may need to acquire a better under- 
standing of the clinical utilization of radioisotopes in diagnostic and therapeutic 
procedures. 

13 



Tlie Naivy Welcomes ITou 



As a resident you will have an opportunity to observe and to participate in the 
professional and social life of the Naval Medical Corps. 

In turn, the Navy will welcome you and your family. We believe that your 
acquaintance with Navy life and our professional accomplishments will influence 
many of you to choose the Navy's Medical Corps as your career. 

The Navy community affords ample opportunity to establish new and worthwhile 
friendships and to participate in the group activities that play such an important 
role in everydoy life. The Navy Doctors' Wives' Club and the Navy Wives' Club 
offer interesting programs and social events for entertainment and relaxation. In 
the Navy one does not remain a stranger for any length of time, for each new 
assignment brings the reunion of old friends. 

A Navy Medical officer is able to spend more time with his family than is a 
civilian physician, except during on occasional "tour of sea duty. His family may 
travel with him on peacetime tours of duty to foreign lands and foreign ports 
throughout the world. 

The naval commissary store is a small supermarket selling quality foods at low 
cost. The Navy Exchange sells clothing, cigarettes, electrical appliances, 
household goods, sporting goods, photographic equipment and supplies, cosmetics, 
and other items at consldercfcle savings. 

The Navy recognizes the importance of child education and provides or makes 
accessible the best possible schools. 



i 



14 



Religious services are regularly conducted at naval stations for the benefit of the 
members of all faiths. 

At all naval stations and hospitals, there are movies and organized recreation 
available to the entire family. There are general libraries for family use, as well 
as medical libraries. Officers' clubs provide facilities for dancing, dining, and 
offier forms of recreation. 



15 



Listed below are fhe approximafe annual incomes of naval medical officers based 
on the number of years' service normally required for promotion to the various 
ranks: 

APPROXIMATE ANNUAL INCOME* 



Rank 



Married or With Single Without 
Dependents Dependents 



LIEUTENANT (JG) USNR 
(INTERNSHIP) 


$ 6,144 


$ 5,945 


LIEUTENANT (during internship) 


6,785 


6,580 


LIEUTENANT (after internship) 


7,985 


7,780 


LIEUTENANT COMMANDER 


11,010 


10,704 


COMMANDER 


13,374 


12,966 


CAPTAIN 


16,134 


15,930 


REAR ADMIRAL—Lower Half 


19,722 


19,314 


REAR ADMIRAL—Upper Half 


21,822 


21,414 



This includes incentive pay which medical and dental officers receive at 
the rate of $100 a month during the first two years of active service, 
exclusive of internship. This amount is Increased to $150 a month during 
the third to sixth years inclusive, $200 a month during the seventh to 
tenth years inclusive, and $250 a month for those who have completed 
10 or more years of active service . 



16 



The Navy docfor's fake-home pay compares favorably with that of a civMian 
physician. His income is not reduced by the usual overhead expenses associated 
with private practice. His Navy benefits include vacations with pay, full pay 
during illness, and retirement pay , 

The Navy medical officer is provided with excellent medical and dental care, 
including hospitalization. His dependents are eligible for medical core and 
hospitalization. 

A Navy medical officer who becomes disabled and unfit for duty is eligible for 
physical disability retirement benefits or severance pay, depending on the length 
of active service and the degree of his disability. 

Naval medical officers may voluntarily retire after 20 years of active duty, if 
their request for retirement is approved by the Secretary of the Navy. 
Retirement pay is computed at the rate of 2-1/2 per cent of base pay, multiplied 
by the number of years of service. Recent legislation authorized longevity 
credit for the four years of medical education, plus one year for civilian 
medical internship. This longevity credit is reflected in the base pay and 
is used to compute the retired pay of a naval medical officer. For example, 
after 20 years of active duty, a captain receives $568 monthly retired pay; 
after 25 years of active duty the monthly retired pay of a captain is $738. 
In addition, retired naval medical officers are entitled to receive Social 
Security benefits* 

The naval medical officer is entitled annually to 30 days' leave, and may accumu- 
late up to 60 days of leave . 

Railroads allow discounts for military personnel in uniform. 

Officers' clubs provide a wide variety of recreational and entertainment facilities 
amid attractive surroundings at reasonable cost. 

The naval medical officer enfoys the peace of mind that comes with financial 
security in health, in sickness or in disobility. His increase in pay is commen- 
surate with his increase in rank, and within-grade raises are automatic. 



17 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE TO THE OFFICER IN CHARGE OF YOUR 
NEAREST: 

XT.S. NAVY 



ALBANY 1, NEW YORK 

PosJ" Office Building - Broadway 

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 
106 Broadway, Southeast 

ASHLAND, KENTUCKY 
321 13th Street 

BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 

Post Office Building - Calvert and Fayette Streets 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Post Office and Court House Building 

18th and 19th Streets and 5th Avenue, N. W. 

BOSTON 10, MASSACHUSETTS 
560 Atlantic Avenue 

BUFFALO 3, NEW YORK 

Post Office Building - Elllcott, Swan and Oak Streets 

CHICAGO 5, ILLINOIS 
536 S. Clark Street 

CINCINNATI 2, OHIO 

Harrison Building —209 East Sixth Street 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Federal Building - Public Square 

COLUMBIA 1, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Federal Court House Building, 1 100 Laurel Street 

COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 

New Post Office Building - Gay and Marconi Streets 



18 



DALLAS 2, TEXAS 
1320 Jackson Street 

DENVER 2, COLORADO 

New Customs House - 19th and California Streets 

DE5 MOINES 9, IOWA 

Federal Office Building - 5th and Court Streets 

DETROIT 26, MICHIGAN 

Room 413, Federal Building - Fort and Shelby Streets 

HOUSTON 31, TEXAS 

Veterans Administration Hospital - Post Office Box 17085 

INDIANAPOLIS 2, INDIANA 
215 East New York Street 

JACKSONVILLE 1, FLORIDA 

Post Office Building - 31 1 West Monroe Street 

KANSAS CITY 8, MISSOURI 
2603 Walnut Street 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Post Office Building - 2nd and Center Streets 

LOS ANGELES 17, CALIFORNIA 
759 South Figueroa Street 

LOUISVILLE 2, KENTUCKY 

Post Office Building - 7th and Broadway 

MACON, GEORGIA 
653-63 Second Street 

MINNEAPOLIS 1, MINNESOTA 

Federal Office Building -Washington and 2nd Avenues, South 

NASHVILLE 3, TENNESSEE 

New Court House Building - Broad Street and 9th Avenue, South 

(Continued, next page) 

19 



NEW ORLEANS 40, LOUISIANA 

Room 302, U.S. Customs House - 423 Canal Street 

NEW YORK 13, NEW YORK 
346 Broadway 

OKLAHOMA CITY 2, OKLAHOMA 
Buick Building — 1101 North Broadway 

OMAHA 11, NEBRASKA 
Naval Personnel Center 

PHILADELPHIA?, PENNSYLVANIA 
Blackburn Building - 13 South 13th Street 

PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 

Old Post Office Building - 300 Smittifield Street 

PORTLAND, OREGON 

Pioneer Post Office - 520 S. W. Morrison Street 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. and Court House - 300 Fayetteville Street 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
900 North Lombardy Street 

ST. LOUIS 1, MISSOURI 

Old U.'S. Customs House - 815 Olive Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 

Federal Office Building -Leavenworth and Fulton Streets 

SEATTLE 1, WASHINGTON 
1 10 Union Street 

WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 
631 "E" Street, N.W. 



20 



You may obtain additional information concerning the 
Navy's Residency Training Program by vislttng or 
writing the Officer in Charge of your nearest U. S, 
Navy Recruiting Station, by contacting the Command- 
ing Officer of your nearest Naval Hospital, or by 
writing direct to the Chief, Bureau of Medicine and 
Surgery, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, 
D. C. 



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